MUSEUM OF ME

a game-based, sel CURRICULUM for hs students

museum of me

A GAME-BASED, SEL CURRICULUM FOR HS STUDENTS

who am i? how closely does my social image reflect how i feel inside?

Museum of Me is a game-based, SEL curriculum for high school English Language Arts, humanities and media studies classes that helps teens explore these questions and engage in deep social and emotional learning while they learn core literacy concepts. 

HOW DOES MUSEUM OF ME WORK?

Over 90% of teens between the ages of 13 and 17 play video games. Created in partnership with expert teachers Paul Darvasi of Royal St. George’s College in Toronto and Matthew Farber, an assistant professor at the University of Northern Colorado’s School of Teacher EducationMuseum of Me meets teen students where they are by using Giant Sparrow’s What Remains of Edith Finch as a rich text with opportunities for students in junior and senior English Language Arts, media studies and humanities classes to explore identity. This game-based, SEL curriculum allows teens to reflect on a powerful story while they develop self-awareness, empathy, and other critical academic, social and emotional skills. 

HOW DOES MUSEUM OF ME WORK?

Over 90% of teens between the ages of 13 and 17 play video games. Created in partnership with expert teachers Paul Darvasi of Royal St. George’s College in Toronto and Matthew Farber, an assistant professor at the University of Northern Colorado’s School of Teacher EducationMuseum of Me meets teen students where they are by using Giant Sparrow’s What Remains of Edith Finch as a rich text with opportunities for students in junior and senior English Language Arts, media studies and humanities classes to explore identity. This game-based, SEL curriculum allows teens to reflect on a powerful story while they develop self-awareness, empathy, and other critical academic, social and emotional skills. 

what makes museum of me unique?

Educators lead teens through a game-based, SEL curriculum on identity. Students  play What Remains of Edith Finch on a video game console or a computer as a class and engage in rich conversations about the complexities of understanding identity, both a character’s identity and their own.

As Edith explores her home and revisits the stories of her family members, students connect the stories they uncover in the game with elements of their own life stories, those they may choose to share publicly and those they keep private. The game-based, SEL curriculum covers:

  • environmental storytelling
  • figurative language
  • narrative mechanics such as flashbacks and nonlinear storytelling
  • personal identity exploration 
  • how artifacts tell stories about their owners, intentionally or not

Students explore relevant questions such as, “How have labels others have applied to me shape how I see myself? How do I talk about what has happened to me in my life, and why does that matter? How do I use items I own and wear to project a certain image?

what makes museum of me unique?

Educators lead teens through a game-based, SEL curriculum on identity. Students  play What Remains of Edith Finch on a video game console or a computer as a class and engage in rich conversations about the complexities of understanding identity, both a character’s identity and their own.

As Edith explores her home and revisits the stories of her family members, students connect the stories they uncover in the game with elements of their own life stories, those they may choose to share publicly and those they keep private. The game-based, SEL curriculum covers:

  • environmental storytelling
  • figurative language
  • narrative mechanics such as flashbacks and nonlinear storytelling
  • personal identity exploration 
  • how artifacts tell stories about their owners, intentionally or not

Students explore relevant questions such as, “How have labels others have applied to me shape how I see myself? How do I talk about what has happened to me in my life, and why does that matter? How do I use items I own and wear to project a certain image?”

whAT ARE PEOPLE SAYING ABOUT MUSEUM OF ME?

“I think that games are important in learning as they allow someone to explore knowledge in a way that isn’t just reading from a textbook or watching a video. I find it very interesting to be able to learn interactively, in fact I find that I absorb more knowledge in a game than in a textbook.”

“If there is a character that is going through something, then I use that as a catapult to guide [students] through the process to learn that about themselves … You get those ‘Ah ha’ moments that teachers look for…. I’m trying to get the students to build self awareness, to build self esteem, and looking at things about themselves that they wouldn’t typically talk about in a typical class setting.”

Brian Harmon, Pilot Teacher

“I think my understanding of myself definitely changed a great deal, through the Museum of Me project I was able to deal with some aspects of myself that I never really had before. Also through talking about the projects I learned about my friends too.” 

HOW DO I GET INVOLVED?

Click here to contact us for information about bringing the game-based, SEL curriculum to your classroom or to make a donation that supports an under-resourced school’s adoption of this unit.

Museum of Me Pilot Packet×
Museum of Me Pilot Packet | iThrive Games Foundation
I agree to the terms and conditions

HOW DO I GET INVOLVED?

Click here to contact us for information about bringing the game-based, SEL curriculum to your classroom or to make a donation that supports an under-resourced school’s adoption of this unit.

Museum of Me Pilot Packet×
Museum of Me Pilot Packet | iThrive Games Foundation
I agree to the terms and conditions

z

ANNOUNCEMENT

Read our announcement about the creation and purpose of Museum of Me, written by our executive director and chief scientist, Susan Rivers, Ph.D. 

more information

To learn more about game-based learning, check out Dr. Matt Farber’s recent books, Game-Based Learning In Action and Gamify Your Classroom, both published by Peter Lang, Inc.

contact

To learn more about teaching Museum of Me in your classroom or after-school program, contact us for an early release version.

here’s what students have to say:

Bitnami